New stuff! New Projects!

Hello all,

I’ve had a busy month, and realized how long it had been since I got out here with an update. Several new projects are in flight, and should be ready to announce them shortly.

I have a new short story from the Longbow Initiative, and it’s a #Halloween story! I’m shooting to have it up on Amazon by the 18th, assuming #Eris stops giving me little challenges.Featured image

I had a great event at the Charleston Scottish Highland Games in September, signed a few books, and had some heavy objects thrown!

I’ve also gotten some more new artwork coming, the first of which is the Longbow Initiative emblem which will be rolled out in Spirits of the Season, and also will be in the next newsletter. It’s coming, really.

For those out there who are also of a creative bent, I’m working on a book project with a working title of The Business of Creativity. I have a lot of friends and contacts who endeavor in all sorts of creative enterprises, from hobbyists to people who pursue their creative arts for a living.

As of late, several of these friends seem to be going through a couple of similar challenges, and they all revolve around the business side of their creative arts, including two artists and an author. I’ve had this project bubbling for years, and it seems like the time to tackle it, among everything else I’ve got working. But a couple of primers.

#1 – The starving artist – making a living from your art is a lot of hard work, and usually is much harder than the creative process. It’s also OK to make a living from your art. I’ve had a few people tell me over the years that if you make too much from your art, you’re selling out, and you lose that creative spirit.

Well, you’re right. It’s much better for others to profit from your work and creative efforts while you struggle to get the materials for your art, invest the time, bring it to market, and make just enough profit for a case of Ramen Noodles. Get over it. If you can make a good living from your art, then the universe is rewarding you for your efforts! And if it’s just a side hobby and it pays your bar tab, that’s great too! It’s okay to profit from creativity!

#2 – Now that you’re over #1, and the Ramen Noodles aren’t cutting it, how do you turn an art into a business? Unless you are very lucky, it’s about time, patience, and discipline. Hugh Howey graciously held a lunch meet and greet at Dragon Con this year. I had read Wool when it was just starting to pick up speed, and I think this interview is a great resource. He credits luck and timing for being ‘discovered,’ and then navigating the trials of success.

http://www.writersdigest.com/online-editor/how-hugh-howey-turned-his-self-published-story-wool-into-a-success-a-book-deal

#3 – And I’ll be writing more about this, but your art is about you. Marketing people would call it ‘building your brand.’ No matter your art, you need to find the people who connect with you and your work. And a big part of that is that people want to know and understand you. Don’t be needy. Don’t be whiny. But be you.

As I start outlining the book, I’ll post more of it here, and if you think you have a story you want to share, let me know!

PS – to all of the rest of you who aren’t using some talent to be creative – quit watching reality TV and give whatever it is you always really wanted to do a try.

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